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Things to Do to Help Your Child

One out of ten Canadians lives with a serious communication disorder – a speech, language or hearing problem. Many of them are children. Often these problems go undiagnosed and untreated, and this leads to problems in school and in life. If you are concerned about your preschool child’s speech and language development, complete the Language Express Communication Checkup, check the milestones on the Language Express website or call us at 1-888-503-8885. If you are concerned about hearing, ask your family doctor or nurse practitioner for a referral for hearing testing. Remember that it is never too early to get help for your child! Language Express services are available by phone and video conferencing during the pandemic.

2 and a half and Under

  • Young children learn to make speech sounds through observation, imitation, and practice. You can help:
    • DO: Be face-to-face as much as possible;
    • DO: Repeat correctly, so that the child hears a clear, correct version of what he/she just said. For example, if the child says, “Mo teese!” you could say, “More cheese. I want more cheese please.”
    • DON’T: Ask the child to try again or tell him that he said it wrong. If the child is receiving speech therapy, you can ask the Speech-Language Pathologist if there are other ways you can help.

As a parent, you play an important role in the development of your baby’s brain. You are your baby’s most important connection to the world. You interact daily with your baby. These interactions have a life-long effect on your baby’s ability to reach full potential. This website will help you support your baby’s brain development from birth to age 3.

2 and a half and Over

  • Young children learn to make speech sounds through observation, imitation, and practice. You can help:
    • DO: Be face-to-face as much as possible;
    • DO: Repeat correctly, so that the child hears a clear, correct version of what he/she just said. For example, if the child says, “Mo teese!” you could say, “More cheese. I want more cheese please.”
    • DON’T: Ask the child to try again or tell him that he said it wrong. If the child is receiving speech therapy, you can ask the Speech-Language Pathologist if there are other ways you can help.

Getting Ready for Kindergarten

Ready for Kindergarten Checklist

Children get ready to read long before they start school. From birth to 3 years, children are learning about spoken language and vocabulary, the sounds that form words, letters and writing, and how books work. Make book sharing a special part of your everyday routine starting at birth. You don’t have to read the words. Talk about the pictures that interest your child. Let your child hold the book and turn the pages. Check out this Language Express newsletter for more things you can do at home to raise a child who is ready to read.

All Ages

The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends families follow the four “M”s when it comes to screen time and young children:

Minimize screen time

Screen time for children under 2 is not recommended. For two- to five-year-old children, limit routine screen time to less than one hour a day. Maintain daily screen-free time, especially at meals and at least an hour before bedtime.

Mitigate the risks associated with screen time

Be present and engaged when screens are used and, whenever possible, co-view with children. Be aware of digital content, prioritizing educational, age-appropriate, interactive content.

Be mindful about the use of screen time

Conduct a self-assessment of screen habits and develop a family media plan for when, where and how screens may (and may not) be used and be reassured there is no evidence to support introducing technology at a young age.

Model healthy screen time

Adults should turn off their devices at home during family time, turn off screens when not in use and avoid background TV.

Read the full position statement.

1-888-503-8885 or 613-283-2742