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COVID-19 and Business

New Isolation Requirements for Household Members of Individuals with Symptoms

  • ALL household members of individuals with new or worsening symptoms of COVID-19 are required to self-isolate until the individual with symptoms receives a negative COVID-19 test result or an alternative diagnosis by a health care professional.
  • If the individual with symptoms does not seek COVID-19 testing, they are considered a ‘probable case’ and must isolate for 10 days from their onset of symptoms and ALL household members must self-isolate for 14 days from their last close contact with the symptomatic individual. Call Public Health for guidance on how to isolate safely within a household.

Ontario’s COVID-19 Response Framework

GREEN (Prevent) Level

As of Tuesday, February 16, 2021 the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit (LGLDHU) is in the Green – Prevent zone of Ontario’s COVID-19 Response Framework. This Framework and O. Reg. 364/20: RULES FOR AREAS IN STAGE 3 detail what types of businesses can open and operate and related public health measures that must be taken. Check our Ontario’s COVID-19 Response Framework webpage for more information on how the Province’s measures affect the Leeds, Grenville, Lanark area.

Information for Businesses

The menus below contain general information on popular topics related to businesses/organizations. For greater detail, check our Ontario’s COVID-19 Response Framework webpage for more information on how the Province’s measures affect the Leeds, Grenville, Lanark area.

Mask/face covering use is mandatory in all public indoor settings across the province, such as businesses, facilities and workplaces. For detailed information, see the menu entitled Mandatory Face Coverings/Masks in Ontario on our Face Coverings/Masks webpage. These restrictions add to the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark (LGL) Medical Officer of Health Face Covering/Mask Instruction that was renewed on October 1, 2020. Workers must wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) that protects their eyes (e.g., safety goggles/glasses, face shield), nose and mouth (e.g., mask/face covering), if in the course of providing services they are:

  • Required to come within 2 metres of another person who is not wearing a mask or face covering.
  • In an indoor area and are not separated by plexiglass or some other impermeable barrier.

Use this poster in your premises to advise the public of face covering/mask requirements.

All businesses/organizations must have a COVID-19 Workplace Safety Plan in place. Use this sample COVID-19 Workplace Safety Plan and COVID-19 Safety Checklist as guides to create your own. The Safety Plan must be in writing and be made available to any person to review it on request. A copy of the Safety Plan must be posted in a publicly available space where it could come to the attention of staff or patrons.

It is essential for business owners to conduct a risk assessment and to apply a combination of infection prevention and control practices as appropriate for your workplace. There are several practices that can be put in place to ensure a safer workplace environment that protects and prevents against infection. It is important to remember that some practices are more effective than others, as depicted in the Hierarchy of Controls diagram on this page. From most effective to least effective, the recommended practices are:

  • Limit in person contact (e.g., work from home, use virtual services).
  • Change the physical environment (e.g., barriers, physical distancing markers in lineups, hand hygiene stations).
  • Introduce administrative protocols (e.g., screening, policies, staff training and education).
  • Use Personal Protective Equipment (e.g., mask/face covering, face shield, gloves).

Other Resources:

There are no social bubbles in the workplace. This means:

  • Physical distance from others at least 2 metres at all times.
  • Wear a face covering/mask and other PPE (e.g., face shield, eye protection) as required.
  • Do not congregate in the lunch room.

We have had and continue to have COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces in our region. Please remain diligent and COVID-smart to prevent outbreaks:

  • SSelf-isolate if you have symptoms of COVID-19. Consider getting tested.
  • MMask/face covering on when in enclosed public spaces and when physical distancing is a challenge outdoors.
  • A – Avoid touching your face.
  • R – Remain 2 metres/6 feet apart from people you do not live with.
  • T – Twenty (20) seconds for regular hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette (cough or sneeze into a tissue or your arm).

Child care centres remain open in all zones, subject to reopening plans and epidemiology of the virus. Refer to our COVID-19 and Child Care section for further information.

For local information on who to call if you have a concern or complaint see the COVID-19 Response Chart.

Visit the website of your local municipality for information on municipal services and resources during COVID-19.

Leeds and Grenville

Lanark

Hierarchy of Controls

Most effective to least effective recommended COVID-19 business practices pyramid

For Employers

Screening staff and essential visitors:

Screening patrons:

  • Businesses must implement passive screening for patrons (e.g., posting signs outside the store front advising patrons about not entering if they have COVID-19 symptoms). Use this COVID-19 Symptom Screening Poster.
  • Beginning in the Orange – Restrict zone, active screening of patrons may be required for some businesses. You can use this COVID-19 Customer Screening tool.
  • Consider which employees can work from home.
  • Consider an online meeting platform to meet with customers or colleagues.
  • Establish and/or maintain online or telephone ordering services.
  • Refer to this fact sheet from the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario for information on how staff working from home can maintain privacy, security, and access to information in their work.
  • Avoid encouraging travel between regions when promoting your business. Travel between regions (regardless of what level of Ontario’s COVID-19 Response Framework the regions are in), is recommended for essential purposes only.
  • Use appointments to limit the number of people in one place.
  • Monitor the number of people in your premises, consider half or reduced capacity.
  • Monitor customers while in the business to ensure they keep their distance. Use signs, marks on the floor, staff directing traffic flow, and your PA system.
  • Use clear barriers to protect workers where possible. See supply list for plexiglass in Leeds and Grenville.
  • If you use vehicles as part of your business consider one person per vehicle or one employee in the front seat and another employee in the back seat.
  • Stagger employee work schedules and breaks.
  • Set up the break and lunch rooms so people can stay 2 metres/6 feet away from each other.
  • Consider the flow of your business. Customers should be directed one way throughout your place of business.
  • If possible, have a separate Entrance and Exit door to avoid customer congestion.
  • Reduce the amount of money being exchanged. Encourage debit, credit or e-transfers.
  • Maintain curbside and delivery services as part of your normal business.
  • Retailers should restrict the number of customers per square metre – for example, one customer per 4 square metres (43 square feet) – this allows for physical distancing of 2 metres at all times.
  • Remove loose items such as condiments, stir sticks, pens, straws, pamphlets, brochures and other items that may be touched by multiple people.
  • Commonly used cleaners and disinfectants are sufficient at killing COVID-19.
  • Ensure that the disinfectant has an 8 digit Drug Identification Number (DIN). List of disinfectants with evidence of use against COVID-19.
  • Commonly touched areas such as doors, door handles, light switches, seating including arm rests, barriers between customers and employees, debit machines, shopping carts etc. should be cleaned at least twice a day.
  • Washrooms are cleaned and disinfected at least every two hours.
  • Washrooms that are open to the public should be closely monitored for cleanliness. Depending on frequency of use they may need to be cleaned and disinfected more than once every two hours. 
  • Read this fact sheet for more on Cleaning and Disinfecting Bathrooms Used by the Public as well as our Frequently Asked Question and Answers document.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions when mixing cleaners or disinfectants.
  • Have proper training for employees to handle cleaners and disinfectants and have Safety Data sheets available and bottles or containers properly labeled.
  • For more, see this Public Health Ontario resource on cleaning and disinfecting in public settings.
  • Implement a formal screening process for COVID-19. Use the Ontario self-assessment tool.
  • Implement a human resource policy that outlines clear instructions for staff on actions to take if they, or a visitor, screen positive or negative on the assessment tool.
  • Contact public health for consultation on policy development, and for advice on what to do if there has been a potential exposure in your workplace.
  • Train and educate employees on workplace infection prevention and control measures (e.g., on proper use of PPE, hand hygiene, physical distancing, and cleaning and disinfecting practices). Use the videos, posters, and fact sheets on this webpage to support this training.
  • Support the mental and emotional health of your employees: CMHA’s 6 Tips to Respond to Employee Anxiety about COVID-19.
  • Consider recording each patron’s name and contact information to support the contact tracing done by public health in the case of a patron or staff member testing positive for COVID-19
  • Encourage your employees’ overall health. Refer to our Physical Activity and Mental Wellness page for resources.
  • If ever there was a system that relied on multiple parts and complex processes it is the human immune system. Its job is to protect us against disease by fighting infection. It needs at least 11 different vitamins and minerals as well as protein, carbohydrates and some fat to build it and keep it going. Provide everyone the space and time they need to eat meals. Check out our Healthy Eating section for more information on healthy eating at the workplace. Keep in mind that some of your employees maybe be challenged with food insecurity.

Supporting Employees to Return to Work

As businesses start to re-open, some employees may feel stress and anxiety with re-integrating into a modified workplace as well as the possibility of exposing themselves and/or their families to COVID-19. The Canadian Mental Health Association has outlined a number of ways in which employers can support employees’ return to work during these difficult times. Here are a few tips:

  • Have a Plan: Let employees know that you have conducted a risk assessment unique to your workplace and have developed a workplace safety plan that complies with public health recommendations and requirements. Engage interested and appropriate employees in the monitoring and evaluation of your plan, and be open to revisions based on feedback and/or as new information emerges.
  • Communicate: Fear and anxiety can grow in the absence of up-to-date and accurate information. Reassure employees that you are looking ahead, staying well informed on the current status of COVID-19 in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark and that you are seeking out credible sources of information. Let your employees know that they can expect regular updates from you and that you will seek answers to any questions they may have.
  • Acknowledge the ‘New Normal’: Share that you know these times are stressful and that it is okay to be anxious. Acknowledge that this is not quite ‘business as usual’ and that there may be long term changes to the way your business operates. Reassure staff that expectations will shift accordingly and you are there to support them in this new work environment.
  • Support Mental Health: Encourage employees to practice self-care and reassure them that it is ok to take steps to manage stress (e.g. relaxation exercises, listening to music, taking regular breaks). Ensure employees are aware of workplace tools to support their transition back to work (e.g. EAP), and direct employees to local coping, helping and mental wellness resources.

COVID-19 and Business – Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Your employee may have been advised to self-isolate at home while waiting for test results. If your employee has received public health advice to self-isolate, they should NOT be going into work.
  • Individuals who have had close contact with this employee may need to take additional precautions; they will be contacted by public health.
  • In your workplace continue to practice physical distancing and use resources on cleaning and disinfecting public settings and public washrooms.
  • For local information on who to call if you have a concern or complaint see the COVID-19 Response Chart.
  • Individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19 are directed to self-isolate. Public Health will be in contact with individuals who test positive for COVID-19 and their close contacts daily to provide education and guidance on their self-isolation period, and when it can be discontinued.
  • The Health Unit is not providing letters for return to work with negative test results. Often people who have had COVID-19 can test positive for a length of time after they have completed their isolation and are no longer contagious. This is because they can still have dead virus  in their bodies that is detected by the test. If they have been cleared by our staff they are safe to return to work. This is usually 10 days after the onset of symptoms or 14 days for those that are asymptomatic.
  • Individuals who have had close contact with this employee may need to take additional precautions; they will be contacted by public health.
  • Use resources on the For Employers page that help to facilitate physical distancing, as well as cleaning and disinfecting public settings and public washrooms.
  • If you receive questions from your employees, direct them to the For Employees section on this page.
  • For local information on who to call if you have a concern or complaint see the COVID-19 Response Chart.
  • Individuals who have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 will be contacted by public health.
  • They will receive education and instruction from public health on self-monitoring and/or self-isolation. If your employee has received public health advice to self-isolate, they should NOT be going into work.
  • For local information on who to call if you have a concern or complaint see the COVID-19 Response Chart.

The Health Unit is not providing letters for return to work with negative test results. COVID-19 test results are private health information. You may ask an employee for their test results before they return to work and if they consent they can share them with you verbally or show them to you.

  • Public Health will be in contact with your business and will work with you to conduct a risk assessment. Recommendations will be made in support of workplace health and safety.
  • An individual who tests positive will be directed to self-isolate. They should NOT be accessing public spaces or stores.
  • Public Health will be in contact with individuals who test positive for COVID-19 and the people they have been in close contact with on a daily basis to provide education and guidance on their self-isolation period, and when it can be discontinued.
  • Use resources on the For Employers page that help to inform cleaning and disinfecting of public settings and public washrooms.
  • For local information on who to call if you have a concern or complaint see the COVID-19 Response Chart.
  • Download the COVID Alert App on your smartphone. The app can alert you if you may have been exposed to COVID-19 and let others know if you test positive for COVID-19, without sharing any personal information.

As per the Public Health Instruction, “Every Operator of an Enclosed Public Space shall adopt a policy to ensure that no member of the public is permitted to enter or remain in the public areas of the Enclosed Public Space unless he or she is wearing a Face Covering/Mask in a manner that securely covers their nose, mouth and chin.”

In the event that a person enters your business premises without a face covering/mask, you can kindly remind the person that they must wear a face covering/mask in your business premises, and then there are 3 scenarios that could occur:

  1. The person puts on a face covering/mask and can enter your business premises.
  2. The person indicates they qualify for an exemption as per the Public Health Instruction. Kindly allow the person to enter your business premises without a face covering/mask. Do not ask any follow-up questions. No person shall be required to provide proof of any of the exemptions.
  3. The person indicates they do not qualify for an exemption as per the Public Health Instruction and refuses to put on a face covering/mask. Remind the person to bring a face covering/mask the next time they come as this is now required. Some businesses provide masks for sale for this kind of situation.

We are all in the fight against COVID-19 together. It is so important that we all protect each other’s health and do everything we can to ensure our local businesses can continue to operate safely for everyone.

We kindly ask that everyone acts in good faith regarding the mandatory face covering/mask Instruction. Wearing a face covering/mask in Enclosed Public Spaces is an important tool, in addition to staying home when sick and getting tested, maintaining at least 2 metres/6 feet physical distancing, washing your hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, and avoiding touching your face, in limiting the spread of COVID-19.

Regardless of whether someone is wearing a face covering/mask or not, please treat everyone with respect and courtesy. For more information, please read the Rationale for the mandatory face covering/mask decision.

The Public Health Instruction is requiring Operators to do the following:

  • Post signage in your premises to advise the public of face covering/mask requirements.
  • Have alcohol-based hand sanitizer available for use at all entrances and exits.
  • Remind customers of the mandatory face covering/mask requirement. As per the Instruction, implementation of the policy should be enacted and enforced in ‘good faith’ and should be primarily used as a means to educate people on face covering/mask use in Enclosed Public Spaces.

We are not asking Operators to refuse or confront customers.

For Employees

  • Talk to your employer about work from home options.
  • Complete the COVID-19 self-assessment before going to work.
  • Follow your workplace screening policies.
  • Wash or sanitize your hands.
  • Bring only what you need into the building and make sure these items are clean.
  • If you become sick while at work, notify your supervisor and leave immediately.
  • Adhere to all the infection prevention and control measures in the workplace:
    • Wash or sanitize your hands often.
    • Sneeze or cough into your sleeve.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Stay 2 metres (6 feet) from others.
    • Keep work surfaces clean and disinfected.

For the Public Accessing Businesses

As per the Public Health Instruction, a business Operator shall not refuse any person entry into their business premises if the person claims they qualify for an exemption, as per the Public Health Instruction, including those who are accommodated under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) or who have protections under the Ontario Human Rights Code, R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19, as amended.

No person shall be required to provide proof of any of the exemptions.

At this time, Operators are encouraged to use an educational approach to encourage all people entering to use a face covering/mask. 

As per the Trespass to Property Act, an Operator can refuse entry and/or service. If they do so in violation of other legislation, including but not limited to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) or the Ontario Human Rights Code, R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19, as amended, there may be consequences (e.g., a violation of human rights claim).

*NOTE: Businesses are complying with this instruction to protect the health of their customers, staff and our community. Finding ways to work together so we can all get through this difficult time is important. If you feel you are being denied service, reach out to the business to see if there are alternative ways to interact (e.g., curbside pick-up).